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Kelsey

Kelsey

Kelsey Brookes is a professional designer, online strategist and writer.

From the late 90s Kelsey managed the multimedia and film courses at the prestigious Computer Graphics College, Sydney and eventually founded the Melbourne chapter of the college.

At the same time, Kelsey was a feature writer for Digital Media World magazine, interviewing subjects from the Australian and overseas film and production industries.

Since 1999 Kelsey has managed thinksync, providing design, online strategy and marketing services to clients around Australia.

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Tue 23
May
2017

I was recently discussing social media with a friend in the antiques business looking for new ways to market online. Having just launched a new online store he was casting about for marketing opportunities to engage a broader range of customers beyond search marketing.

Facebook and twitter immediately came to mind. We eventually came to the conclusion that these channels might provide his business with an opportunity to engage a younger audience, both for the investment and aesthetic value of antiques.

While that's a great answer, one with the opportunity to create a significant market niche, I've had a nagging feeling we missed something critical in our casual dismissal of the typical antiques demographic.

It didn't take much to discover that, as in so many areas, baby boomers are hitting social media big time.

Tue 23
May
2017

We've all had the experience of dealing with unreasonable people. It's not just designers who have 'clients from hell', but it's designers who've built an homage to client horror stories with clientsfromhell.com.

I'll be the first to admit - I had more than one sympathetic laugh as I clicked through the backstories.

At the same time, I grew more and more uncomfortable with what I was reading. Not that I think the site's inappropriate in any way, we all need a place to vent and a sympathetic ear to commiserate. I'm certainly not engaging in some PC tsk tsking about the poor treatment of clients at the hands of merciless designers.

Instead, as I read through the site, I came to realise that for many of the authors their war stories represented their own failures as businesspeople rather than that of their clients.

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